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Crisis Care vs. Health Care

Crisis Care vs. Health Care

The conventional view of health is that the body is an intricate piece of machinery that is subject to breakdowns. The focus is on systems and parts that go awry. The object is to try to fix parts that don’t work right. Conventional “health care” is a “service center” for bodies with problems. Run low on insulin/oil, add the necessary ingredients to make the machine run better. An artery/hose becomes clogged, rip out the old and replace it. Parts are fixed, snatched out, or replaced all in the name of “health care.” However, how many parts must be removed from a sick body to make it healthy?

Rather than being reactive to disease, why not be proactive for health? Instead of trying to fix symptoms, we need to address the source of the problem that caused the symptoms. What is the CAUSE that mandates low insulin levels, high blood pressure, or decreased immunity? What stresses has the body been compelled to adjust to over the long haul that would CAUSE such a response? What is the CAUSE? The CAUSE is what we’re interested in with the Morter HealthSystem.

Of course, if you or someone close to you is in imminent danger of dying, or if blood is gushing from a gaping wound, your immediate concern is to survive the crisis. Retrospection and long-term planning aren’t high priorities. You need crisis care. And, conventional medicine is exactly what you need for that.

However, crisis care has become the foundation of our whole so-called “health care” system. Real health has almost nothing to do with it. Our current system is one of “crisis management” – working to detect and correct critical breakdowns in the machinery of the body. And that’s good. That’s necessary. But, it has nothing to do with “health.”

Health is much more than the absence of symptoms! That’s one of the reasons governmental health-care reforms won’t solve our so-called “health care crisis.” Symptoms may be eased and there may be earlier detection of catastrophic problems, but unless the cause of the problem is resolved, symptoms of some sort will crop up again in some other way, as your body’s systems adjust for survival of the moment. You can be assured that if you “fix” the body so that one set of symptoms can’t return – like taking out the gall bladder to relieve the agony of gallbladder “attacks” – other symptoms will appear somewhere else. Doctoring and fixing go only so far. You’ll keep generating symptoms until you do something about the cause that made the symptoms necessary in the first place. When the cause is eliminated or corrected, symptoms are unnecessary. And, when symptoms become unnecessary, the body can heal itself.